Thursday, July 05, 2007

Attending to Trivialities

From William Stafford:
"This witness would note, confess, or assert, how small--how trivial--the elements which lead to a poem (or any work of art, or theory, or a truth) are. That is, the beginning impulse and perhaps the successive impulses too are often so colorless, so apparently random, so homeless and unaccountable, that most people would neglect them: they don't seem to amount to much. It is by lending faith and attention to these waifs of thought that we allow their meanings to develop, sometimes. And their mutual reinforcement is the composition of the poem, or the realization of any creative endeavor."
(from The Answers Are Inside the Mountains: Meditations on the Writing Life)
Thus, the problem of stress, of busy-ness: it limits the writer's ability to attend to those "waifs of thought." Without energy, without a kind of quietude, those small voices can hardly be heard at all.

3 comments:

Rodrigo said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Rodrigo said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Rodrigo said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.